© 2019 by Charity Parrish

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Conflict-Free Diamonds

March 29, 2017

 

For many couples, choosing to elope means choosing to spend the money that would normally be spent on high wedding costs on something (or things) that really matters to them. For some couples, something that matters to them is a diamond engagement ring. And while there are many wonderful alternative engagement ring options (some of which we will be covering soon in a blog post), there's nothing wrong with wanting a more traditional diamond stone. But for those who want the beauty of a diamond, how do you go about avoiding blood diamonds? According to wikipedia.org, blood diamonds are, 

 

"...A term used for a diamond mined in a war zone and sold to finance an insurgency, an invading army's war efforts, or a warlord's activity. The term is used to highlight the negative consequences of the diamond trade in certain areas, or to label an individual diamond as having come from such an area. Diamonds mined during the recent civil wars in Angola, Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone, and other nations have been given the label.[1][2][3] The term conflict resource refers to analogous situations involving other natural resources."

 

TheKnot.com released an article (link here and bottom of article) providing some excellent information on how to go about finding a diamond that is conflict-free. What's the short answer?

 

"Learn the facts and ask the right questions." 

 

Some companies these days, such as Brilliant Earth, advertise conflict-free stones specifically. A quick Google search for "conflict-free diamonds" yields many results worth investigating. This article by TheGoodTrade.com lists 16 ethical and conflict free engagement rings with information about each company. 

 

With the emphasis on the higher standard approach, you might think conflict-free diamonds would be more expensive, but not according to The Knot. 

 

"If you work with a jeweler you trust and research before you buy (our list of useful links is a good start) you can know you've done your part in being a responsible diamond shopper."

 

 

So if a diamond ring is the way you choose to go, it's easy to make the more responsible choice and find a diamond that is conflict-free. Do you have any favorite conflict-free diamond rings, either your own or others you've seen? Or maybe you know of a jeweler with amazing conflict-free diamond options. If so, I'd love to hear about it! Leave us a note below or message us! 

 

Lots of love, folks. Until next time,

 

Charity Parrish

 

 

 

 

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